Hartley Unknown Tintypes and Photos

 

The top two tintypes, 1 & 2, immediately below were provided by Melda Hartley Silk and Frances Cronin. I have used a number of techniques to try to identify any writing on front or back. I believe fairly confidently I see the words G. Leroy Hartley on the slats of the chair. I would like anyone looking at these pictures to determine if they believe the two are George L. and/or Charles Hooker Hartley. Email me or call me with their opinion. I believe that the man on the left in photo 2 is the same as the boy photo1. The photo 3 of the two males in bowties I believe to be of G. L. & Hooker Hartley. I am, however not totally sure. Since George was 12 years older this may seem unlikely, however if you look closely at Hooker I believe you will agree he could be a boy of 12-13 dressed for some special occasion, maybe church related. Still the tintype portrait, also included, of Hooker causes some doubt for my ids. One problem is the wavy hair of the the man in pict 2. If however you look at picture 8, the back of G. L.’s hair is not flat, but sticks out which might indicate wavy. Tintype 3 definitely shows some waves. Picture 4 is a tintype of Charles Hooker. Could Hooker be man on right in Pict 2? Melda Silk, his daughter thinks it might be. Pat Oakes thinks not. I have also included the very few pictures of George W. Hartley, G. L and Hooker’s father.

 

Tintype Identification

1. Highly likely to be G. L. Hartley, compare with two men at right.
2. Can this be G. L. Hartley and Charles Hooker?
3. Younger version of two young men in photo above right.
4. Charles Hooker Hartley, about 1900.
5. Believed to be G. L. Hartley?
6. G. L. Hartley? If so then photo about 1880
7. G. L. Hartley? c. 1885
8. G. L. Hartley
9. George H. and son G. L. Hartley
10. George H. Hartley and family, around 1868
Picture found behind Fred and Margie Oakes marriage license. In 1858 in Chancery Court in Claiborne County, MS there was a divorce proceeding that involved Caroline Dungan who asks the court to grant her a divorce from her husband, Jacob Dungan. “The petitioner discloses that two years ago her husband "committed the crime of adultery with a certain negro slave," confiding that Jacob has "openly and notoriously lived apart from your Oratrix, and in adultery with said negro slave, with whom he has constantly committed, and still does daily commit, the crime of adultery." The complainant seeks to dissolve her marriage and asks the court to order her husband to answer her charges. Witnesses deposed in the case state that Jacob Dungan freely admitted his adulterous relationship with the "mulatto woman named Sarah" and acknowledged as his own her two children, who are "as white as any white children, with straight hair." Witnesses also state that Dungan told them that he had freed Sarah and her children.” Jacob and Sarah moved to Ohio and after his death she married and had more children. Eventually they all appeared in the census as white. This woman seems to dark to be labeled mulatto.
There is another possibility. In the 1900 Census there is a widow, Julia Hatley(maybe Hartley), living in Vernon, Madison County, MS with her son Charlie Henry, 48, and his two children John 24, married and Roxie, 22, married. Julia is 64 making her born 1836 so she would have been a slave. She list Kentucky as her birth place as well as her parents. She likely chose her name from her slave owner. The fact that my mother saved the picture implies some connection to the family.
Samuel Richard 9 (1896), George Benjamin 10(1995), Edward Lee 7(1898), George L. 41 (1863), Unknown girl 6(1899),Unknown child 1 1/2 (1903), Mary Elizabeth “Betty” 28 (1876), maybe Mary Caroline Hartley Talley in back, ca 1905
Back: Samuel Richard, George Benjamin, Edward Lee, Alma Lee, Leila Mae
Front: George H. Hartley(G.L.’s Father), George Leroy. and Mary Elizabeth Hartley
About 1902